The Time is Right for Social Work

The Time is Right for Social Work

Social Work
Most people know that social workers exist, however, most people don’t fully understand what Social Workers do and the many ways that they can help.  If they know one personally, they know they work hard and invest a lot of time and themselves in the people that they help. March is a whole month dedicated to these amazing, self-sacrificing people who serve others in more ways than we will probably ever know.
What is a social worker? A social worker is someone who helps people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives. They are available to assist with healthcare, aging, advocacy, child welfare, mental health, substance abuse, research, policy, developmental disabilities and more.

 

Oncology social workers help patients, families and caregivers as they deal with a cancer diagnosis. They help with the emotional, social, psychological and spiritual issues, as well as many practical needs. Social workers will look at all aspects of your life and can provide information and guidance in ways you can’t even imagine and these services are usually free.

Assistance with depression or stress management, talking with children or employers about a diagnosis, palliative care, and finding community resources to help with expenses, transportation and other problems are some of the ways a social worker can make a difference to you or your family. Social workers can help with insurance matters and financial assistance programs as well as advance directives. A list of resources in the area is usually at the ready so that you can save time doing research. A social worker can help with decision-making about treatments, changes at different stages of survivorship, and can be a continual support throughout a cancer experience or for a short period of time. In-house social workers can help with communication of other members of the healthcare team.

 

It’s important to reach out early in your diagnosis and not wait until issues become challenging. If the services of a social worker are not offered to you by your cancer healthcare team, ask if one is available where you are being treated or in the area who is familiar with the needs of cancer patients. CancerCare.org has a network of services and social workers available to help with all areas of life affected by a cancer diagnosis.

Asking for help is one more way to help take control of your cancer, find support, and live your best life with a cancer diagnosis.

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) will help lead the 2022 Social Work Month celebration in March with the theme “The Time is Right for Social Work,” which underscores the contributions social workers have made to this nation for more than a century and how the services they provide are needed more than ever as our nation addresses economic inequality, systemic racism, the need for improved health and mental health care, Covid-19 and other issues.

Take part by learning more about social workers, seeking help if needed, and thanking the social workers in your life.

“Each day, social workers empower millions of Americans so they can live life to their fullest potential. Social workers also work in communities and in politics to improve living conditions for all. During Social Work Month we urge you to learn more about our amazing profession, thank the social workers in your lives, and help support the profession.”

Join our Focus Group

Join our Focus Group

Help make the 2022 version of the Spanish Bag It bag even better! We are recruiting individuals touched by cancer to give input on the bag that best reflect Latino and Hispanic culture, values and belief!

Are you interested?  Click here to complete a short form.

 

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Attitude of Gratitude

Attitude of Gratitude

Coping with cancer, Covid, or other health or life challenges can make it tough to remember our blessings during this season of giving, gratitude, and celebration we call “the holidays.”

But expressing gratitude goes beyond refocusing away from our challenges to simply find the goodness in our lives. Its power also enables us to accept the struggles that are present in our lives while also fostering resilience and hope – making it a practice worthy of adopting even during the most difficult of times.

Gratitude research finds links with stress relief, improved social ties/relationships, benefits to physical well being like better sleep, lower inflammation, blood pressure, and pain, as well a positive correlation with healthier lifestyle factors like diet and exercise.

Ongoing studies are being conducted to study the effects of what happens to the brain when a person practices gratitude. Findings suggest that it may help train the brain to be more sensitive to the experience of gratitude, which could contribute to lasting effects and improved mental health over time.

Your gratitude practice doesn’t have to be complicated. Adopting gratitude as part of your routine takes consistency and some time. You can be grateful for past, present or future blessings, and the more specific the entries, the better.

Write a thank you note or letter of appreciation to someone, then decide if you want to send it to the person. You don’t have to share it, though it might be a way to strengthen a relationship.

There are apps aplenty in the app stores if you want to record your entries digitally, and they even have reminders. Write in a journal, or simply and silently list three things you are thankful for as you lie in bed and drift off to sleep. Can’t stay awake long enough? Spend a few minutes in the morning before you get up and start your day. This can also be a good way to set an intention for the day. Gratitude, meditation and prayer are also methods of appreciating the joy in our lives. Use whatever works for you!

The Importance of Being Your Own Advocate

The Importance of Being Your Own Advocate

Hear from Bag It Founder, Sherri Romanoski, as she shares with Impact Gap the importance of patient-physician communication, being your own advocate, and survivorship. Impact Gap is a graduate student-run, patient-centered podcast group at the University of Toronto. Their mission is to provide a platform to amplify patient perspectives, acknowledge patients as experts in their care, and raise awareness for important patient issues.

Organizational Mission and Purpose

Organizational Mission and Purpose

Listen to a conversation between Bag It Executive Director, Mindy Griffith and Matt Nelson, about Bag It’s purpose and what it means to have an organizational mission. They will discuss how that relates to workplace culture on his podcast Culture @ Work. Culture @ Work focuses on learning from and celebrating the local leaders, businesses, and non-profit organizations who’ve stood the test of Tucson time.

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